You are here

Find Your Perfect Social Media Mix

11/02/2015

As social media matures, testing content and analyzing data play an increasing role in marketers' attempts to find the perfect "sales versus content" mix. Here are a few ideas you can try to focus on the needs of your market and to make the most of every post, whether you're posting as a brand or an individual. 

The 4-1-1 method. For every four pieces of relevant, original content from others, you should post one sales piece of content. On Twitter, you should have a ratio of one retweet for every one self-serving update. 

The 5-3-2 method. This method suggests running five pieces of content from others, three pieces of your own content, and two personal status updates or sales posts. 

Optimal frequency. Marketing automation company Buffer has collected a number of studies to discover the best frequency for top social media sites to strike a balance between being informative and being annoying. They report the following optimized frequencies:

  • Twitter: Five times per weekday to maximize engagement with each post. Up to 30 times per weekday to maximize Twitter presence.
  • Facebook: Two times per day, seven days a week, between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
  • LinkedIn: One time per day at 8:00 a.m. No posts on weekends.
  • Google+: Two times per day, at 9:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. No posts on weekends.

Some of these rules may be bent or broken depending on your audience, but these tips will provide a good starting point to help you test responsiveness and engagement, so you can build a more effective social media marketing plan for your business. 

Feel free to pass these helpful tips along to your team, clients and colleagues! 

Source: Entrepreneur.com

--

By: Michael Borodinsky

Vice President/Regional Builder Branch Manager | Caliber Home Loans

NMLS #460228

 

 

 

 

 

 

Call Michael: 732-382-2654

Email Michael: Michael.Borodinsky@caliberhomeloans.com

Follow Michael on Twitter: @mikeborodinsky

Share

Search

Featured Companies

Twitter Feed